Endo·dna https://endodna.com Cannabis is personal. Mon, 21 Sep 2020 16:25:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://endodna.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/cropped-endo_dna_favicon-32x32.png Endo·dna https://endodna.com 32 32 When Getting High Gets You Angry. What Your DNA Can Tell You. https://endodna.com/2020/10/13/when-getting-high-gets-you-angry-what-your-dna-can-tell-you/ https://endodna.com/2020/10/13/when-getting-high-gets-you-angry-what-your-dna-can-tell-you/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 21:47:00 +0000 https://endodna.com/?p=209750 Nearly 70% of the general population is genetically predisposed to experiencing aggressive behavior and could be at risk for an adverse event with THC..[1*] In other words, under certain conditions, approximately seven in ten people may act in a way that poses risk to themselves or another person.

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Learn how your DNA can alert you to your genetic predispositions and help you mitigate adverse reactions with cannabis.

Does this sound familiar?

You’re considering a cannabis product to help with your anxiety. You’ve struggled to find ways to deal with your anxiety for years. Nothing seems to work consistently. More than anything, you want to be able to be around your friends in public places without having to worry about where the nearest exit is in case you have a sudden panic attack. 

A trusted friend calls a particular cannabis strain a “miracle” and swears it helped them manage their anxiety and relax at night. You decide to give it a try. At your local dispensary, you buy the same strain your friend recommended. You smoke the cannabis on your back porch and hope it helps relieve the tightness in your chest so you can unwind.

Almost immediately, you feel irritated. Little things, like your partner calling twice in a row or your remote control not working, make you mad. You try to do a puzzle to calm down, but when you can’t find the piece you’re looking for you throw the puzzle box at the dining room wall. It takes you nearly 24 hours to feel better.   

You assume your anger with cannabis was just a fluke or a coincidence. Desperate for some relief from your persistent anxiety, you smoke more of the strain after work the next day. You get angry when the delivery man forgets a part of your dinner order. You end up calling the manager and yelling at him.   

In the morning, you rule out cannabis therapy and assume all cannabis will make you aggressive and angry. You’re left feeling discouraged and your anxiety is bad for weeks. 

In your process of trial and error, though, you’ve overlooked an important component that determines your therapeutic experience with cannabis. Your DNA. 

Nearly 70% of the general population is genetically predisposed to experiencing aggressive behavior and could be at risk for an adverse event with THC..[1*] In other words, under certain conditions, approximately seven in ten people may act in a way that poses risk to themselves or another person.

If you’ve experienced these symptoms as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis formulations aren’t aligned with your unique genetic profile.

THC adverse events quiz

Experiencing aggressive behavior with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to stress reactivity and anxiety.

Below, you’ll learn more about aggression, how cannabis interacts with your genetics, and how you can manage THC adverse events with the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan.

What is aggression and aggressive behavior? 

In psychology, aggression refers to behaviors that can result in both physical and psychological harm to yourself, others, or objects in your environment. 

Usually, aggressive behavior poses risk to another person either physically or mentally. Common forms of aggressive include:

  • Intimidating or verbally berating another,  
  • Emotionally manipulating or abusing another, 
  • Physically harming yourself, another, or an object, or
  • Threatening to do harm to yourself, another or an object. 

Both physical and psychological aggression can be very damaging. Whether the purpose of aggressive behavior is for competition, to assert dominance, to express anger or hostility, or a reaction to fear, it has the ability to harm. 

Aggressive behavior can occur due to a number of influential factors, including biological, environment, and medical factors. For example, men are more likely to engage in physical aggression than women, though women do tend toward non-physical forms of aggression such as social rejection.[2]

Mental health disorders that often see outbursts of aggressive behavior include Alzheimer’s disease, Autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Aggression with these disorders can vary in degree and frequency depending on other influencing factors 

How you were raised can also influence your aggressive tendencies. Famously, in the early 1960s scientists conducted what became known as the Bobo Doll Experiment. The study found that preschoolers who observed an adult participant acting aggressively toward a clown bobo doll mimicked the aggressive behavior toward the doll later. Preschoolers who observed an adult participant act calmly and non-aggressively toward the clown bobo mirrored this behavior later when they were alone with the doll.[3] 

Key takeaway:

  • Aggression is behavior that can result in both physical and psychological harm or damage.
  • Common forms of aggression include verbal, mental, emotional, and physical harm.
  • Threats to engage in these behaviors are also considered aggressive.
  • Aggression is naturally influenced by genetic, environmental, and physical factors.
Cannabis on Table

Aggressive behavior as an adverse side effect of THC.

Like all chemical compounds, including prescription medications and other substances, cannabis can lead to side effects. 

Some cannabis side effects are therapeutic. They allow you to relax and provide relief from disorders, diseases, or discomfort. 

Other cannabis side effects, however, cause distress to the body and result in adverse events. Approximately 31% of the general population has reported experiencing an adverse event with THC, which means adverse reactions are fairly common.[4†] 

Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience aggressive behavior as an adverse event with cannabis.  

If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate aggression as an adverse event with THC. 

Knowing your risks starts with understanding your genetic predisposition to adverse events.

You should always consult your healthcare provider when making decisions regarding your wellness routine and cannabis therapy. 

Key takeaway:

  • Like prescription medications and other chemical compounds, cannabis can lead to side effects.
  • If you’re genetically predisposed to aggression, you may be at risk of experiencing anger, rage, or unpredictable aggressive behavior as a side effect of THC.
  • The first step to mitigating these events with cannabis is understanding your genetic predispositions so you can determine if you’re at risk for adverse events.

Aggression, THC, and your endocannabinoid system. 

Your endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a system of messengers found throughout your body. Like most of your biological systems, your ECS is as unique as your thumbprint. It’s functioning is determined by genetic, epigenetic, developmental, and environmental factors. 

Along with a host of critical functions, your ECS is responsible for regulating important systems like your mood, appetite, and immune function. 

When you use a particular cannabis varietal, strain, or product, the cannabinoid and terpene profiles interact with your endocannabinoid system. The external cannabinoids (exogenous cannabinoids) are added to your system’s internal cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), which can disrupt or augment your ECS messaging. 

Psychoactive effects from cannabis, like aggressive behavior, are caused by cannabinoids binding to the cannabinoid receptors within your body. Depending on the cannabinoid and terpene ratios of your cannabis product and your own unique genetic coding, the resulting effects are either therapeutic or lead to an adverse reaction.[5]

If you’re predisposed to aggression based on your genotype, you may be at risk for experiencing anger, rage, or unpredictable aggressive behavior as an adverse event with THC.

Key takeaway:

  • When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system. This can lead to anger, rage, or unpredictable aggressive behavior in people who are genetically predisposed to aggression.

How to mitigate aggressive behavior when you’re using cannabis.

If you’ve experienced adverse events with THC, or if the risk of experiencing adverse events with THC is preventing you from trying cannabis therapy, you should know that adverse side effects are completely manageable.

The key to mitigating aggressive behavior when you’re using cannabis is to decode your genetics, discover your unique endocompatibility, and use cannabis strains, varietal, and products with cannabinoid and terpene profiles that are aligned with your genotype.

With the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan, you can find reliable products to optimize your cannabis therapy outcomes.

To learn more, take this 10 question quiz and discover if you may be genetically predisposed to adverse events with THC.

 

References

1. *Endocanna Health used specific allele frequencies and genotype heterozygosity to determine general population percentages for genetic predispositions.

4. †Endocanna Health determined the potential predisposition of THC adverse events in the general population.

ECS THC adverse events

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

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Is THC Making You Feel Depressed? Your DNA can tell you why https://endodna.com/2020/09/29/is-thc-making-you-feel-depressed-your-dna-can-tell-you-why/ https://endodna.com/2020/09/29/is-thc-making-you-feel-depressed-your-dna-can-tell-you-why/#respond Tue, 29 Sep 2020 23:56:00 +0000 https://endodna.com/?p=209619 Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience feelings of sadness or disinterest with cannabis.

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Use your DNA to discover your genetic predispositions and help you mitigate adverse reactions with cannabis.

 Does this story sound familiar?

You’re considering a cannabis product to help you manage severe anxiety. You’ve dealt with anxiety for years and you’re tired of letting your anxiety dictate your life. You’re on a mission to find a therapy product that lets you do the thing you love without having to worry about panic attacks and that awful tightness in your chest.

Your brother swears by a particular cannabis strain and says it’ll help calm your nerves; you decide to give it a try. You buy pre-rolled cannabis from your local dispensary and triple check to make sure it’s the strain your brother recommended. You smoke the cannabis on your back porch and settle in for the night, hopeful that you’ll feel less nervous before bed.

But after you smoke, you feel sad. You put on your pyjamas, tuck your kids in, and go to bed feeling defeated. In the morning, you feel as anxious as ever and feel like you’re on the verge of another panic attack.

When you tell your brother what happened, he thinks you smoked too much or too little and he tells you to try again. That evening, you invite him over so you can follow his dosing advice exactly. After he leaves, you go to bed feeling sad and lethargic again.

In the morning, you rule out cannabis therapy and assume all cannabis products will make you feel depressed. Your anxiety is still unmanageable and you’re left more discouraged than ever.

In the process of trial and error, though, you’ve overlooked an important component that determines your therapeutic experience with cannabis. Your DNA.

As much as 40% of the general population is genetically predisposed to depressive feelings and may be at risk for an adverse event with THC.[1*] In other words, under certain conditions, four in ten people will experience sadness, lethargy, or disinterest due to their genetic makeup. 

If you’ve experienced these symptoms as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis therapy is misaligned with your unique genetic profile.

Experiencing adverse events with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to experience depressive feelings. 

Below, you’ll learn more about depressive feelings, how cannabis interacts with your genetics, and how you can manage THC adverse events with the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan.

THC adverse events quiz
Cannabis

What are depressive feelings? 

Depressive feelings are a set of feelings that are often associated with depression. While depressive feelings and clinical depression are different, their symptoms can overlap. 

It’s important to note that there are a host of factors that may contribute to depressive feelings, including environmental, genetic, and epigenetic influences. 

Depressive feelings can include feelings of:[2]

  • Sadness, 
  • Extreme lethargy, 
  • Reduced appetite, 
  • Disinterest, 
  • Excessive tiredness, or
  • A general lack of energy.

Depressive feelings affect how you feel, think, and behave. They can occur in a number of different mood disorders including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). 

Feeling down from time to time is a normal part of life. But when depressive feelings begin to make life unmanageable, it’s time to talk to a professional. If your depressive feelings are persistent, check in with your healthcare provider. 

Key takeaway:

  • Depressive feelings are often associated with clinical depression, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder (SAD).
  • While depressive feelings and clinical mood disorders are different, their symptoms can overlap.
  • Depressive feelings can include sadness, extreme lethargy, distinterst, or feeling excessively tired.
  • When depressive feelings begin to make life unmanageable, it’s time to talk to a professional.

Depressive feelings as an adverse side effect of THC.

Like all chemical compounds, including prescription medications and other substances, cannabis can lead to side effects.

Some cannabis side effects are therapeutic. They allow you to relax and provide relief from disorders, diseases, or discomfort. 

Other cannabis side effects, however, cause distress to the body and result in adverse events. Approximately 31% of the general population has reported experiencing an adverse event with THC, which means adverse reactions are fairly common.[3†]

Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience feelings of sadness or disinterest with cannabis. 

 

Woman cryinng

If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate depressive feelings as an adverse event with THC. 

Knowing your risks starts with understanding your genetic predisposition to adverse events.

You should always consult your healthcare provider when making decisions regarding your wellness routine and cannabis therapy. 

Key takeaway:

  • Like prescription medications and other chemical compounds, cannabis can lead to side effects.
  • If you’re genetically predisposed to depressive feelings, you may be at risk of experiencing sadness, disinterest, lethargy, or hopelessness as a side effect of THC.
  • The first step to mitigating these events with cannabis is understanding your genetic predispositions so you can determine if you’re at risk for adverse events. 

Depressive feelings, THC, and your endocannabinoid system. 

Your endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a system of messengers found throughout your body. Like most of your biological systems, your ECS is as unique as your thumbprint. It’s functioning is determined by genetic, epigenetic, developmental, and environmental factors. 

Along with a host of critical functions, your ECS is responsible for regulating important systems like your mood, appetite, and immune function. 

When you use a particular cannabis varietal, strain, or product, the cannabinoid and terpene profiles interact with your endocannabinoid system. The external cannabinoids (exogenous cannabinoids) are added to your system’s internal cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), which can disrupt or augment your ECS messaging.  

Psychoactive effects from cannabis, like experiencing depressive feelings, are caused by cannabinoids binding to the cannabinoid receptors within your body. Depending on the cannabinoid and terpene ratios of your cannabis product and your own unique genetic coding, the resulting effects are either therapeutic or lead to an adverse reaction.[4]

If you’re predisposed to depressive feelings based on your genotype, you may be at risk for experiencing sadness or lethargy as an adverse event with THC. 

Key takeaway:

  • When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system.
  • This can trigger feelings of sadness, lethargy, or disinterest in populations who are genetically predisposed to depressive feelings. 

How to mitigate depressive feelings when you’re using cannabis. 

If you’ve experienced depressive side effects adverse events with THC, or if the risk of experiencing adverse events with THC is preventing you from trying cannabis therapy, you should know that adverse side effects are completely manageable. 

The key to mitigating depressive feelings like sadness and lethargy when you’re using cannabis is to decode your genetics, discover your unique endocompatibility, and use cannabis strains, varietal, and products with cannabinoid and terpene profiles that are aligned with your genotype. 

With the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan, you can find reliable products to optimize your cannabis therapy outcomes.

To learn more, take this 10 question quiz and discover if you may be genetically predisposed to adverse events with THC. 

_______________

References

1. *Endocanna Health used specific allele frequencies and genotype heterozygosity to determine general population percentages for genetic predispositions. 

3. †Endocanna Health determined the potential predisposition of THC adverse events in the general population.

ECS THC adverse events

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

The post Is THC Making You Feel Depressed? Your DNA can tell you why appeared first on Endo·dna.

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Is Cannabis Making Your Insomnia Worse? There’s a fix for that https://endodna.com/2020/09/22/is-cannabis-making-your-insomnia-worse-theres-a-fix-for-that/ https://endodna.com/2020/09/22/is-cannabis-making-your-insomnia-worse-theres-a-fix-for-that/#respond Tue, 22 Sep 2020 23:00:00 +0000 https://endodna.com/?p=209625 If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate symptoms of insomnia as an adverse event with THC.

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Learn how your DNA can alert you to your genetic predispositions and help you mitigate adverse reactions with cannabis and THC.

Can you relate to this experience?

You’re considering a cannabis product to help you fall asleep at night. You’ve struggled with falling asleep for years. You’ve tried all sorts of remedies, like over-the-counter products and prescription medicine, but they make you feel groggy in the morning. You want a therapy routine that will help you sleep so you can be present throughout the day. 

Your best friend swears that taking THC-infused gummies before bed lets her sleep the whole night through. You decide to talk with your local budtender about your specific needs. He sells you a bag of gummies and promises you’ll sleep like a baby. You leave the dispensary excited to try your new cannabis therapy products and you’re hopeful that your sleep problems will be solved. 

After you take the gummies at night, you lie in bed tossing and turning. You keep waiting to feel sleepy, but you really just feel thirsty and hot and restless. You don’t fall asleep until 4:00 am. 

You call the dispensary and tell them what happened. Your budtender thinks you didn’t take enough gummies, and he gives you particular instructions for a bedtime routine. Before bed, you follow his directions exactly. 

But it doesn’t help. Your insomnia is worse than ever. You call off work the next morning because you haven’t slept at all. 

The next day, you rule out cannabis therapy and assume all cannabinoid products will make your insomnia worse. You’re left feeling discouraged and go back to the drawing board. 

In your process of trial and error, though, you’ve overlooked an important component that determines your therapeutic experience with cannabis. Your DNA. 

Approximately 34% of the general population is genetically predisposed to insomnia and may experience restlessness or have trouble falling or staying asleep with cannabis or THC.[1*] If you’ve experienced these symptoms as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis therapy is misaligned with your unique genetic profile. 

Experiencing adverse events with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to insomnia. 

Below, you’ll learn more about insomnia, how cannabis interacts with your genetics, and how you can manage THC adverse events with the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan. 

THC adverse events quiz

What is insomnia? 

Insomnia is a type of sleep disorder characterized by persistent trouble falling and/or staying asleep. People who suffer from insomnia may also have difficulty feeling energized after sleep. 

They often report feeling fatigued and tired throughout the day. 

Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder, according to the American Psychiatric Association (APA). Approximately one in three adults report insomnia symptoms, though about one in ten adults will be diagnosed with insomnia disorder.[2]

Insomnia can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetic, epigenetic, and environmental stressors. Factors that contribute to insomnia can include:[3] 

  • Medical illness, 
  • Psychiatric illness, 
  • Medication or substance use, 
  • Poor sleep habits, or
  • Situational factors such as stress. 

Chronic insomnia can accompany other sleep disorders including sleep anxiety and nightmare disorders. If you experience persistent trouble falling or staying asleep, or if you never truly feel rested after sleep, be sure to check in with your healthcare provider.

Key takeaway:

  • Insomnia is a type of sleep disorder characterized by persistent trouble falling and/or staying asleep.
  • It is the most common type of sleep disorder, and is often affected by factors like medical illness, psychiatric illness, poor sleep habits, or medication and/or substance use.
Cannabis on Table

Insomnia as an adverse side effect of THC.

Like all chemical compounds, including prescription medications and other substances, cannabis can lead to side effects. 

Some cannabis side effects are therapeutic. They allow you to relax and provide relief from disorders, diseases, or discomfort. 

Other cannabis side effects, however, cause distress to the body and result in adverse events. Approximately 31% of the general population has reported experiencing an adverse event with THC, which means adverse reactions are fairly common.[4†] 

Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience difficulty sleeping or restlessness at night with cannabis. 

If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate symptoms of insomnia as an adverse event with THC. 

Knowing your risks starts with understanding your genetic predisposition to adverse events.

You should always consult your healthcare provider when making decisions regarding your wellness routine and cannabis therapy. 

Key takeaway:

  • Like prescription medications and other chemical compounds, cannabis can lead to side effects.
  • If you’re genetically predisposed to symptoms of insomnia, you may be at risk of experiencing restlessness or difficulty falling and/or staying asleep as a side effect of THC.
  • The first step to mitigating these events with cannabis is understanding your genetic predispositions so you can determine if you’re at risk for adverse events. 

Insomnia, THC, and your endocannabinoid system. 

Your endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a system of messengers found throughout your body. Like most of your biological systems, your ECS is as unique as your thumbprint. It’s functioning is determined by genetic, epigenetic, developmental, and environmental factors.  

Along with a host of critical functions, your ECS is responsible for regulating important systems like your mood, appetite, and immune function. 

When you use a particular cannabis varietal, strain, or product, the unique cannabinoid and terpene profiles interact with your endocannabinoid system. The external cannabinoids (exogenous cannabinoids) are added to your system’s internal cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), which can disrupt or augment your ECS messaging. 

Psychoactive effects from cannabis, like experiencing difficulty sleeping, are caused by cannabinoids binding to the cannabinoid receptors within your body. Depending on the cannabinoid and terpene ratios of your cannabis product and your own unique genetic coding, the resulting effects are either therapeutic or lead to an adverse reaction.[5] 

If you’re predisposed to insomnia based on your genotype, you may be at risk for experiencing difficulty falling or staying asleep as an adverse event with THC. 

Key takeaway:

  • When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system. This can lead to difficulty sleeping in populations who are genetically predisposed to insomnia.

How to mitigate symptoms of insomnia when you’re using cannabis. 

If you’ve experienced insomnia as an adverse event with THC, or if the risk of experiencing adverse events with THC is preventing you from trying cannabis therapy, you should know that adverse side effects with cannabis are completely manageable. 

The key to mitigating symptoms of insomnia when you’re using cannabis is to decode your genetics, discover your unique endocompatibility, and use cannabis strains, varietal, and products with cannabinoid and terpene profiles that are aligned with your genotype. 

With the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan, you can find reliable products to optimize your cannabis therapy outcomes.

To learn more, take this 10 question quiz and discover if you may be genetically predisposed to adverse events with THC.

 

References

1. *Endocanna Health used specific allele frequencies and genotype heterozygosity to determine general population percentages for genetic predispositions. 

4. †Endocanna Health determined the potential predisposition of THC adverse events in the general population.

 

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

The post Is Cannabis Making Your Insomnia Worse? There’s a fix for that appeared first on Endo·dna.

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Klutzy When You’re High? What Your DNA Says About THC and Your Wonky Hand-Eye Coordination https://endodna.com/2020/09/15/klutzy-when-youre-high-what-your-dna-says-about-thc-and-your-wonky-hand-eye-coordination/ https://endodna.com/2020/09/15/klutzy-when-youre-high-what-your-dna-says-about-thc-and-your-wonky-hand-eye-coordination/#respond Tue, 15 Sep 2020 20:17:00 +0000 https://endodna.com/?p=209629 Approximately 42% of the general population is genetically predisposed to psychomotor control impairment and may experience clumsiness or difficulty with coordination as a result of THC.[1*]

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Learn how your genetics can determine your psychomotor predispositions and help you mitigate adverse reactions with cannabis.

Bet you can relate to this:

You’re considering a cannabis product to help you manage symptoms of ADHD. You’ve been searching for therapy to help you slow down and focus for years. You haven’t found a product that works without giving you debilitating side effects. More than anything, you want to be able to pay attention at work so you can work more efficiently and land a big promotion. 

You tell your officemate about your ADHD and she swears that her vape pen helps her manage symptoms just like yours. You decide to give it a try and head to your local dispensary to pick up a vape.  

You use the vape in the evening and try to pour yourself a glass of water but miss the cup entirely. You go to open the fridge but grab the freezer handle by mistake. When you try to slice a lemon, you can’t hold it steady, and you realize you’re experiencing an adverse event with cannabis. 

When you tell your officemate about your experience, she laughs and calls you an amateur. She offers to teach you the right way to use your vape pen and comes over before work one day to share her vape with you. 

After a few pulls, you drop the vape on the floor and can’t pick it up. You call out of work and lay in bed until your psychomotor control returns later in the day. 

When you feel like yourself again, you rule out cannabis therapy and assume all cannabis will make you feel like a klutz and lose control of your motor skills. You’re left feeling discouraged and stressed about finding an effective way to manage your ADHD. 

In your process of trial and error, though, you’ve overlooked an important component that determines your therapeutic experience with cannabis. Your DNA. 

Approximately 42% of the general population is genetically predisposed to psychomotor control impairment and may experience clumsiness or difficulty with coordination as a result of THC.[1*] In other words, under certain conditions, four in ten people are at risk of experiencing poor coordination or may have trouble executing tasks that require the use of fine motor skills.

If you’ve experienced these symptoms as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis therapy is misaligned with your unique genetic profile. 

Experiencing adverse events with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to experiencing impairment in psychomotor functioning. 

Below, you’ll learn more about psychomotor function, how cannabis interacts with your genetics, and how you can manage THC adverse events with the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan. 

THC adverse events quiz

What is psychomotor function? 

Cognitive processes govern everyday physical movements like walking, talking, and chewing. The term psychomotor function refers to the connections between your mental processes and muscle functions. 

Psychomotor functions involve the combination of precise motor responses, attention, and cognitive problem-solving abilities. When your psychomotor functioning is impaired, there is a disconnect between your cognitive processes and your physical actions.[2] 

Impairments in psychomotor control can lead to symptoms like:

  • Moving slowly,
  • Speaking slowly,
  • Difficulty gesturing, 
  • Experiencing spontaneous actions, 
  • Persistent hand-wringing,
  • Agitation, and/or
  • Restlessness. 

Impairment in psychomotor function can be caused by genetic disorders, neurological disorders, chronic illnesses, and hormonal imbalances. Psychomotor impairment can also occur as a result of medication or substance use.

Key takeaway:

  • Psychomotor function refers to the connections between the mental processes and muscle functions used to complete everyday tasks like walking, talking, and chewing.

  • Impairment in psychomotor abilities may lead to difficulty moving, speaking, gesturing, or persistent fidgeting.

  • Although most often associated with neurological and medical conditions, psychomotor impairment can also occur as the result of medication or substance use.

Psychomotor impairment as an adverse side effect of THC.

Like all chemical compounds, including prescription medications and other substances, cannabis can lead to side effects.

Some cannabis side effects are therapeutic. They allow you to relax and provide relief from disorders, diseases, or discomfort.

Other cannabis side effects, however, cause distress to the body and result in adverse events. Approximately 31% of the general population has reported experiencing an adverse event with THC, which means adverse reactions are fairly common.[3†] 

Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience difficulty completing regular tasks on cannabis. 

If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate psychomotor impairment as an adverse event with THC. 

Knowing your risks starts with understanding your genetic predisposition to adverse events.

You should always consult your healthcare provider when making decisions regarding your wellness routine and cannabis therapy. 

Key takeaway:

  • Like prescription medications and other chemical compounds, cannabis can lead to side effects.
  • If you’re genetically predisposed to impairment in psychomotor functioning, you may be at risk of experiencing loss of coordination or difficulty executing regular tasks like walking, talking, or writing as a side effect of THC.
  • The first step to mitigating these events with cannabis is understanding your genetic predispositions so you can determine if you’re at risk for adverse events.
People playing football

Psychomotor control, THC, and your endocannabinoid system. 

Your endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a system of messengers found throughout your body. Like most of your biological systems, your ECS is as unique as your thumbprint. It’s functioning is determined by genetic, epigenetic, developmental, and environmental factors.  

Along with a host of critical functions, your ECS is responsible for regulating important systems like your mood, appetite, and immune function. 

When you use a particular cannabis varietal, strain, or product, the cannabinoid and terpene profiles interact with your endocannabinoid system. The external cannabinoids (exogenous cannabinoids) are added to your system’s internal cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), which can disrupt or augment your ECS messaging. 

Psychoactive effects from cannabis, like impairment in psychomotor functioning, are caused by cannabinoids binding to the cannabinoid receptors within your body. Depending on the cannabinoid and terpene ratios of your cannabis product and your own unique genetic coding, the resulting effects are either therapeutic or lead to an adverse reaction.[4]

If you’re predisposed to psychomotor impairment based on your genotype, you may be at risk for experiencing difficulty falling or staying asleep as an adverse event with THC. 

Key takeaway:

  • When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system.
  • This can lead to impaired coordination in populations who are genetically predisposed to experiencing impairment in psychomotor functioning.

33. How to mitigate impairment in psychomotor functioning when you’re using cannabis. 

If you’ve experienced adverse events with THC, or if the risk of experiencing adverse events with THC is preventing you from trying cannabis therapy, you should know that adverse side effects are completely manageable. 

The key to mitigating impairment in psychomotor functioning when you’re using cannabis is to decode your genetics, discover your unique endocompatibility, and use cannabis strains, varietal, and products with cannabinoid and terpene profiles that are aligned with your genotype. 

With the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan, you can find reliable products to optimize your cannabis therapy outcomes.

To learn more, take this 10 question quiz and discover if you may be genetically predisposed to adverse events with THC. 

 

_______________

References

1. *Endocanna Health used specific allele frequencies and genotype heterozygosity to determine general population percentages for genetic predispositions. 

3. †Endocanna Health determined the potential predisposition of THC adverse events in the general population.

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

The post Klutzy When You’re High? What Your DNA Says About THC and Your Wonky Hand-Eye Coordination appeared first on Endo·dna.

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Hallucinations and Paranoia with THC: What You Need to Know and How to Prevent It https://endodna.com/2020/09/08/hallucinations-and-paranoia-with-thc-what-you-need-to-know-and-how-to-prevent-it/ https://endodna.com/2020/09/08/hallucinations-and-paranoia-with-thc-what-you-need-to-know-and-how-to-prevent-it/#respond Tue, 08 Sep 2020 18:25:00 +0000 https://endodna.com/?p=209637 Experiencing adverse events with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to experiencing symptoms of psychosis. 

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Learn how your DNA can alert you to your genetic predispositions and help you mitigate adverse reactions with cannabis.

 

Has this happened to you?

You’re considering a cannabis product to help manage inflammation and chronic pain. You’ve tried other therapies before, but nothing works for more than a week or two. More than anything, you want a therapy product that’ll let you play Wiffle ball with your niece and nephew at your annual family reunion since they’re growing up fast and you only see them a few times a year. 

Two of your good friends swear that a particular cannabis strain helps them manage symptoms just like yours, so you decide to give it a try. You buy pre-rolled cannabis from your local dispensary and go home hoping some relief is in sight. 

After you use the cannabis, though, you feel strange. In no time, you start hallucinating and become suspicious that the television is broadcasting your thoughts to the neighborhood. You rush to your room and barricade yourself inside. You stuff towels underneath the door so no one can peer in to watch you. You lie awake for hours too afraid to fall asleep.  

When you tell your friends what happened, they think you used too much cannabis and suggest you try a different product. Desperate for some relief from your chronic pain, you take an edible before dinner. You start to panic when the hallucinations begin again and you spend the night locked in your bathroom telling yourself the hallucinations will go away soon.  

THC adverse events

In the morning, you rule out cannabis therapy entirely and assume all cannabis products will make you hallucinate or make you paranoid. You’re left feeling discouraged and disappointed. You figure you’ll simply have to learn to live with your chronic pain.  

In your process of trial and error, though, you’ve overlooked an important component that determines your therapeutic experience with cannabis. Your DNA. 

Nearly 50% of the general population is genetically predisposed to experiencing symptoms of psychosis and may be at risk for an adverse event with THC.[1*] In other words, approximately one in every two people may experience hallucinations, paranoia, or delusions due to their genetic makeup. 

If you’ve experienced these symptoms as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis therapy is misaligned with your unique genetic profile. 

Experiencing adverse events with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to experiencing symptoms of psychosis. 

Below, you’ll learn more about symptoms of psychosis, how cannabis interacts with your genetics, and how you can manage THC adverse events with the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan. 

Mindful Free Mindfulness and Stress Management Resources

Mindful is so good, they made our list twice. Scroll through their comprehensive listing of courses and articles to find great information about managing anxiety during COVID-19. They’re offering free access to their premium course, Find Calm and Nourish Resilience, and live guided meditations on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 3 pm ET on their Facebook page.

Anxiety Canada – Coping With Coronavirus

Watch the replay of the live town hall hosted on March 26 featuring international experts discussing proven coping strategies for how you can deal with COVID-19. There are also other resources available including the MindShift CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) program, and information about how to talk to children about COVID-19. For a more comprehesive approach to managing anxiety they also have a free, self-paced My Anxiety Plan online course for children/teens and adults.

Healthline – Best Free Mindfulness Apps

If you’re at home and looking for something to do, it can be easy to fall into the trap of mindless scrolling through social media. With all the misformation about COVID-19 circulating, this can be a quick way to spike your anxiety. Instead, take a look at Healthline’s collection of free mindfulness apps that can help you start and sustain a mindfulness practice. THere’s no better time than now to start connecting with your breath and finding calm in the midst of uncertainty.

Psychology Today – Three Steps to Navigate COVID-19 Anxiety

This article will help you navigate your feelings of anxiety and give you tangible steps to build personal resilience in the face of adversity, and stress. Based on science-backed information from other large disasters and crisis situations, you’re presented with a quick guide to help shift your thinking and discover your own strength.

Mindfulness, Healing, and Wisdom in a Time of COVID-19 Guided Meditation

Researcher, author, speaker, and acclaimed expert Jon Kabat-Zinn is one of the most respected and well-known names in mindfulness. Creator of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program, used in hospitals and community settings around the world to help people with health-related stress, Kabat-Zinn has over 40 years of experience in this field. Watch and follow this guided meditation video that specifically addresses the stress and unknown of COVID-19.

Between Sessions Free Mindful Coloring Sheets

Art and creative practices can be a powerful outlet for feelings of anxiety and depression. If you don’t feel like making something fo your own from scratch, download and print these free coloring sheets to keep on hand. They’ll keep your mind occupied and provide an alternative to watching Netflix.

4-7-8 Breathing Techniques

Connecting with your breath is one of the easiest and most effective tools for calming your central nervous system. During times of stress, our fight or flight response is triggered, and if this response isn’t slowed or stopped, over time it can cause health issues. The 4-7-8 breathing technique is one that you can do anywhere. It’s easy to learn and backed by evidence that shows just how effective it can be.

Stress Management: Breathing Exercises for Relaxation

Here’s another great resource from the University of Michigan that describes different breathing practices and how they can be incorporated into your daily routine. The guided steps for belly breathing, roll breathing and morning breathing give you options to choose from and decide what works best for you.

Tiny Buddha – Helpful Free Resources

Tiny Buddha is known for its vibrant online community and inspiring daily content that addresses many of the issues we face regularly – stress, anxiety, substance use, addiction, depression, and grief. Their comprehensive listing of free online resources has something for everyone, no matter what you’re going through right now.

Centers for Disease Control – Manage Anxiety and Stress

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had a variety of resources that can help you manage stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is also a comprehensive section of frequently asked questions that you can review to ensure that you have accurate information about the current state of the coronavirus in the United States. Additional resources related to mental health, substance use and trauma are also available on the website.

THC adverse events quiz

The Mindful Kind Podcast

Rachel Kable is the gentle, calming voice behind The Mindful Kind Podcast. Each episode is about 10 minutes long and is focused on one specific mindfulness theme or technique. Rachel then provides actionable ways that you can use it in your daily life to help find a sense of calm. Her website also features free worksheets and other tools to help you manage your anxiety, learn more about mindfulness, and find effective ways to mitigate stress.

Player.com – Anxiety Podcasts

Player.com provides a great listing of podcasts about anxiety from a wide variety of different voices. Each podcast will have its own specific focus and may include tips and tools on how to manage anxiety, details about other resources that you can connect with in the online community, and interviews with others who have overcome anxiety. This listing will give you inspiration, and provide you with hours of entertainment while you’re at home.

The MindTrails Project

The MindTrails Project is a clinical research study, looking at behavioral-based interventions to help manage anxiety. Provided you qualify for the study, all you need is a tablet or smartphone, and you’ll gain free access to the online training program. This is a tool that can provide immediate relief, and help build skills for long-term management of anxiety and stress. One great upside is that you’ll help contribute to important research that can make a big difference in the lives of others living with anxiety.

Social Distancing: Tips To Navigate the New Normal

The Baylor School of Medicine has put together some quick tips on how to navigate social distancing. During times of crisis or stress it’s important that we build community and connect with others, but social distancing can make this difficult to see people. Tips and suggestions include using online software such as FaceTime or Skype to connect with friends and family, as well as other ways to manage stress related to anxiety and depression in the face of the coronavirus.

Healthy Eating and Meals During COVID-19

During a crisis it can be easy to fall into a cycle of unhealthy eating. Now more than ever it’s important to nourish your body with nutritious food, because we know that the connection between your gut and your mood is very strong. In fact, up to 70% of the serotonin in your body is created in your large intestine, and this neurotransmitter is responsible for feelings of happiness and elevated mood. The eatright.org website offers lots of practical guidance and advice about how to stick to healthy eating habits during this time.

Tom’s Guide – Best Free Workout Apps

Getting regular exercise is an important part of managing feelings of anxiety and stress. For many people, it can provide an instant boost to their mood and help clear their heads. For coronavirus related anxiety, even just a five-minute walk around the block can go a long ways towards reducing uncomfortable feelings. To take it to the next level, Tom’s Guide to the best free workout apps gives you a comprehensive, detailed breakdown of what’s available on the market. Instead of sitting on the couch all day, take some time to incorporate fitness into your routine with these suggestions.

Crisis Services Canada

If you’re having difficulties managing feelings of anxiety during this time, and need to speak to someone, call 1-833-456-4566 or text to 45645. Right now they are experiencing high volumes and longer wait times, however there are additional emergency hotlines in your local community where you can speak to someone directly. If you are in immediate need of assistance or in a life threatening situation call 911.

Mentalhealth.gov – Get Immediate Help 

For immediate help in the United States visit mentalhealth.gov for a complete listing of emergency hotlines that you can call if you are in crisis. This includes the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) – where you can call to speak with someone directly, or start a live online chat. If you are in need of immediate assistance or in a life-threatening situation call 911.

Anxiety and Depression Association of America

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America is a nonprofit organization offering evidence-based resources, and other information to help you navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. With a listing of resources for the public, professionals, and others working on the front lines, this is an invaluable resource with an extensive listing of free programs and services.

Are there other resources that you think should be included? Leave your ideas in the comments and we’ll continue to add your ideas to this post.

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

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Learn how your DNA can alert you to your genetic predispositions and help you mitigate adverse reactions with cannabis.

Can you relate to this? You’re considering a cannabis product to regain your appetite while you’re going through chemotherapy. You’ve tried other therapies, but nothing works. After losing fifteen pounds, you’re tired of feeling weak and exhausted all the time. 

Your most trusted friend swears by a THC-infused cookie. He says it’s the only thing that helped him through his cancer treatments. You decide to give it a try. You spend nearly twenty minutes talking to the budtender at your local dispensary to make sure you’re buying the right product. 

After a few bites, you begin to experience brain fog and have trouble helping your son with his second grade math homework. Later, when your son asks you to do a puzzle with him, you can’t figure out where any of the pieces should go. The experience is enough to make you nervous, so you put your son to bed early and stay in your room for the rest of the night. 

The next morning you feel better and figure you must have gotten a bad batch. You blame the budtender, toss the rest of the cookies in the garbage, and buy a vape pen and some cartridges instead. 

After only a few pulls, you have trouble following the recipe to finish dinner. You can’t seem to remember which steps to do in what order. You throw the ingredients in the garbage, ask your partner to take care of dinner, and spend another night hiding in your room. 

You rule out cannabis therapy and assume all cannabis products will prevent you from thinking clearly. Your cancer treatments continue to affect your appetite and you’re left more discouraged than ever. 

 

THC adverse events quiz

In the process of trial and error, though, you’ve overlooked an important component that determines your therapeutic experience with cannabis. Your DNA. 

As much as 70% of the general population is genetically predisposed to executive functioning impairment and may experience fuzzy thinking with THC.[1*] In other words, under certain conditions, nearly three-quarters of the population might experience symptoms like brain fog, difficulty solving familiar problems, or difficulty completing regular cognitive tasks.

If you’ve experienced these symptoms as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis therapy is misaligned with your unique genetic profile. 

Experiencing adverse events with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to executive functioning impairment. 

Below, you’ll learn more about executive function, how cannabis interacts with your genetics, and how you can manage THC adverse events with the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan. 

What is executive function? 

Executive function refers to a set of important cognitive processes responsible for decision making and problem-solving. Executive function is commonly referred to as “the management system” of the brain since it helps troubleshoot and execute important decision-making processes. 

Although many parts of the brain are necessary to support executive functioning, the prefrontal cortex is closely associated with executive functioning abilities and skills.[2]

Common executive functioning skills are paying attention, staying focused, managing time, prioritizing tasks, and considering multiple solutions to a given problem. 

Impairment in executive functioning can lead to difficulty with:[3]

  • Planning for future events,
  • Stringing together actions to meet long-term goals,
  • Organizing materials,
  • Multitasking,
  • Considering multiple solutions, or
  • Controlling emotions. 

Executive function impairment is not a standalone condition. It typically occurs after acquired traumatic brain injury or other neurologic hardship. It can also occur after use of psychoactive substances, like THC and cannabis.

Key takeaway:

Impairment in executive functioning is an inability to complete complex cognitive tasks like decision making and problem solving. Symptoms include having trouble planning for future events, organizing materials, and/or having difficulty multitasking. Executive function impairment typically occurs after acquired traumatic brain injury, though it can also occur after use of psychoactive substances, like THC and cannabis.

Fuzzy thinking as an adverse side effect of THC.

Like all chemical compounds, including prescription medications and other substances, cannabis can lead to side effects. 

Some cannabis side effects are therapeutic. They allow you to relax and provide relief from disorders, diseases, or discomfort. 

Other cannabis side effects, however, cause distress to the body and result in adverse events. Approximately 31% of the general population has reported experiencing an adverse event with THC, which means adverse reactions are fairly common.[4†] 

Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience trouble thinking clearly with cannabis. 

If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate impairment in executive functioning as an adverse event with THC. 

Knowing your risks starts with understanding your genetic predisposition to adverse events.

You should always consult your healthcare provider when making decisions regarding your wellness routine and cannabis therapy.

Key takeaway:

Like prescription medications and other chemical compounds, cannabis can lead to side effects. If you’re genetically predisposed to impairment in executive functioning, you may be at risk of experiencing fuzzy thinking or have difficulty managing your time and multitasking as a side effect of THC. The first step to mitigating these events with cannabis is understanding your genetic predispositions so you can determine if you’re at risk for adverse events. 

THC adverse events quiz

Which DNA variants are especially important to immune health?

There isn’t one immune system gene, though there are many genetic variants that have a profound effect on your predisposition to experience or develop health complications. 

Scientists keep track of genes by abbreviating their long, complex names. Genetic names are usually abbreviated with letters and, sometimes, numbers. For example, a gene that has been associated with cystic fibrosis is called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Its abbreviated name is CFTR. 

To safeguard your immune system, it’s important to know your genetic predispositions and risks for a variety of biological processes. For a holistic picture of your immune system, you should consider genetic variants that determine your risk for experiencing: 

  • Anxiety (FAAH gene),
  • Nasal inflammation (BDNF gene)
  • Asthma (TNF gene)
  • Influenza (CD55, TNF, and IL17 genes)
  • Severity of influenza symptoms (TNF gene)
  • Respiratory Tract Infections (CNR2 gene)
  • Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura, an autoimmune disease (CNR2 gene)
  • Pain Sensitivity (FAAH gene), and
  • Vitamin deficiencies (RBP4, FUT2, ALPL genes).

If you have genetic variants that determine you’re at risk for experiencing any of these events, you’ll want to support your immune system accordingly. 

It’s important to note that having a genetic predisposition does not mean that you will develop a certain illness. It means that you have an increased risk of experiencing an illness, disease, or biological event in your lifetime when compared to someone who does not have that genetic variant or predisposition. 

Key takeaway:

When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system. This can trigger symptoms of unclear thinking in populations who are genetically predisposed to impairment in executive functioning.

Executive function, THC, and your endocannabinoid system. 

Your endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a system of messengers found throughout your body. Like most of your biological systems, your ECS is as unique as your thumbprint. It’s functioning is determined by genetic, epigenetic, developmental, and environmental factors. 

Along with a host of critical functions, your ECS is responsible for regulating important systems like your mood, appetite, and immune function. 

When you use a particular cannabis varietal, strain, or product, the unique cannabinoid and terpene profiles interact with your endocannabinoid system. The external cannabinoids (exogenous cannabinoids) are added to your system’s internal cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), which can disrupt or augment your ECS messaging. 

Psychoactive effects from cannabis, like fuzzy thinking or executive function impairment, are caused by cannabinoids binding to the cannabinoid receptors within your body. Depending on the cannabinoid and terpene ratios of your cannabis product and your own unique genetic coding, the resulting effects are either therapeutic or lead to an adverse reaction.[5]

If you’re predisposed to impairment in executive functioning based on your genotype, you may be at risk for experiencing fuzzy thinking and diminished cognitive abilities a

Key takeaway:

When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system. This can trigger symptoms of unclear thinking in populations who are genetically predisposed to impairment in executive functioning.

4.How to mitigate fuzzy thinking when you’re using cannabis. 

If you’ve experienced adverse events with THC, or if the risk of experiencing adverse events with THC is preventing you from trying cannabis therapy, you should know that adverse side effects are completely manageable. 

The key to mitigating fuzzy thinking and impaired cognition when you’re using cannabis is to decode your genetics, discover your unique endocompatibility, and use cannabis strains, varietal, and products with cannabinoid and terpene profiles that are aligned with your genotype. 

With the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan, you can find reliable products to optimize your cannabis therapy outcomes.

To learn more, take this 10 question quiz and discover if you may be genetically predisposed to adverse events with THC. 

______________

References

1. *Endocanna Health used specific allele frequencies and genotype heterozygosity to determine general population percentages for genetic predispositions. 

†Endocanna Health determined the potential predisposition of THC adverse events in the general population.

 

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

The post Trouble Solving Simple Problems on Cannabis? Use your DNA to Fix Your Thinking. appeared first on Endo·dna.

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Use your unique genetic profile to know your predisposition to working memory impairment and mitigate your risks of experiencing an adverse event with cannabis.

 

Does this ring a bell?

You suffer from widespread joint pain and inflammation. It’s been years since your joint pain started and you still haven’t found a therapy routine that works for more than a day or so. You’re tired of missing out on the things you used to love to do when chronic pain wasn’t holding you back. 

Your neighbor raves about an edible product and says it helps him manage symptoms just like yours. After turning down a jog with a colleague because of your joint pain, you head to the dispensary and buy some edibles. You head home hopeful that what works for your neighbor will work for you, too. 

Twenty minutes after taking the edible, you ask your partner what day it is. She reminds you it’s your mother’s birthday. You give your mother a call, wish her a happy birthday and hang up quickly when you forget who you’re talking to. A minute later, you ask your partner what day it is again. Your partner laughs and tells you to stop joking. When she realizes you aren’t joking, she becomes concerned. 

The next day, you talk with your partner about your sudden memory loss on cannabis. You say it must have been a fluke since you don’t remember having memory impairment when you smoked pot years ago. 

 

THC adverse events quiz

When your joint pain flares up later that week, you take another edible. You put dinner in the oven and turn on the TV. Every minute or two, you check the clock thinking it’s surely been an hour since you last checked. You lose track of time entirely and only remember your dinner when you see smoke coming from the oven. Your partner gets upset and doesn’t speak with you all evening. 

 

What is working memory impairment? 

Working memory requires the brain to temporarily store and use information. It’s important for daily reasoning and decision making tasks, like reading, holding a conversation, and doing simple math problems in your head. 

The prefrontal cortex is the primary part of the brain involved in working memory, although there are other parts of the brain involved, too. 

When your working memory is impaired, you may experience a disruption in your ability to store and retrieve information.[2] Working memory impairments can also hinder learning since working memory facilitates problem-solving, troubleshooting, and remembering information.

Working memory impairment can lead to difficulty with:[3]

  • Reading and comprehending text,
  • Following multi-step directions,
  • Staying engaged,
  • Keeping track of time, 
  • Focusing on immediate tasks, and/or
  • Listening and repeating information.

Sometimes working memory impairment can occur in children and adults with learning disabilities or result from severe head trauma. Working memory impairment can also occur on its own or as a result of psychoactive substances, like THC and cannabis. 

Key takeaway:

  • Working memory impairment is a disruption in your ability to store and retrieve information to complete daily tasks like reading or holding a conversation.
  • Symptoms include having trouble staying engaged, following directions, or listening and repeating information.
  • Working memory impairment symptoms can be present with learning disabilities, though they can also occur as a result of psychoactive substance use, like THC or cannabis. 
cannabis strains vs formulations

Working memory impairment as an adverse effect of THC.

Like all chemical compounds, including prescription medications and other substances, cannabis can lead to side effects.

Some cannabis side effects are therapeutic. They allow you to relax and provide relief from disorders, diseases, or discomfort.

Other cannabis side effects, however, cause distress to the body and result in adverse events.

Approximately 31% of the general population has reported experiencing an adverse event with THC, making adverse reactions fairly common.[4†]

Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience intense forgetfulness or working memory impairment with cannabis.

If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate side effects of working memory impairment with cannabis.

Knowing your risks starts with understanding your genetic predisposition to adverse events.

You should always consult your healthcare provider when making decisions regarding your wellness routine and cannabis therapy.

Key takeaway:

  • Like prescription medications and other chemical compounds, cannabis can lead to side effects.
  • If you’re genetically predisposed to working memory impairment, you may be at risk of experiencing forgetfulness or have trouble holding a conversation as a side effect of THC.
  • The first step to mitigating working memory impairment with cannabis is understanding your genetic predispositions so you can determine if you’re at risk for adverse events.

Working memory, THC, and your endocannabinoid system.

Your endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a system of messengers found throughout your body. Like most of your biological systems, your ECS is as unique as your thumbprint. It’s functioning is determined by genetic, epigenetic, developmental, and environmental factors. Along with a host of critical functions, your ECS is responsible for regulating important systems like your mood, appetite, and immune function.

When you use a particular cannabis varietal, strain, or product, the cannabinoid and terpene profiles interact with your endocannabinoid system. The external cannabinoids (exogenous cannabinoids) are added to your system’s internal cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), which can disrupt or augment your ECS messaging.

Psychoactive effects from cannabis, like forgetfulness or memory impairment,  are caused by cannabinoids binding to the cannabinoid receptors within your body. Depending on the cannabinoid and terpene ratios of your cannabis product and your own unique genetic coding, the resulting effects are either therapeutic or lead to an adverse reaction.[5]

If you’re predisposed to working memory impairment based on your genotype, you may be at risk for experiencing forgetfulness or have trouble holding a conversation as an adverse event with THC.

If THC is used chronically, it can lead to decreased cognitive abilities, even if you’re not intoxicated. This, however, is not permanent and cognitive abilities can be fully restored after chronic use is stopped.[6]

Key takeaway:

  • When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system (ECS).
  • This can result in adverse events and trigger symptoms of forgetfulness in populations who are genetically predisposed to working memory impairment.

.How to mitigate symptoms of forgetfulness when you’re using cannabis.

If you’ve experienced adverse events with THC, or if the risk of experiencing adverse events with THC is preventing you from trying cannabis therapy, you should know that adverse side effects are completely manageable.

The key to mitigating symptoms of forgetfulness when you’re using cannabis is to decode your genetics, discover your unique endocompatibility, and use cannabis strains, varietal, and products with cannabinoid and terpene profiles that are aligned with your genotype.

With the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan, you can find reliable products to optimize your cannabis therapy outcomes.

To learn more, take this 10 question quiz and discover if you may be genetically predisposed to adverse events with THC.

_______________

References

1 *Endocanna Health used specific allele frequencies and genotype heterozygosity to determine general population percentages for genetic predispositions.

4. †Endocanna Health determined the potential predisposition of THC adverse events in the general population.

 

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

The post Does Pot Make You Forget Things? You’re Not Alone. Learn How Your DNA Can Help. appeared first on Endo·dna.

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Making bad decisions on THC? Learn how your DNA can change that. https://endodna.com/2020/07/29/making-bad-decisions-on-thc-learn-how-your-dna-can-change-that/ https://endodna.com/2020/07/29/making-bad-decisions-on-thc-learn-how-your-dna-can-change-that/#respond Wed, 29 Jul 2020 08:26:00 +0000 https://endodna.com/?p=209410 Nearly 35% of the general population is genetically predisposed to making impulsive decisions and could be at risk for an adverse event with THC.

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Use your DNA to discover your genetic predisposition to impulsive behavior and learn if you’re at risk of experiencing an adverse event with cannabis.  

Does this sound like you?

For years, you’ve been looking for an effective way to manage your chronic pain. It’s an understatement to say your pain symptoms have disrupted your life. It’s even prevented you from getting outdoors, doing the things you love, and playing with your kids.

A colleague recommends you try THC-infused gummies, and you decide to give it a try. He sends you to his dispensary, gives you the name of the budtender he likes best, and tells you the exact product to buy. You pay for a bag of gummies and take one on the way to a work event hoping it’ll give you some relief.

When you get to the party, you make some pretty bad decisions. You embarrass one of your best work friends by telling the room a secret she told you months ago. When the keynote speaker takes the stage, you can’t stop whispering to your neighbor. Someone asks you to please be quiet and you get annoyed. They hear you swearing under your breath as they walk away.

People begin to give you sideways glances. One colleague pulls you aside and asks if you’re okay.

The day after the work event, you cringe remembering how impulsively you acted. You know you owe lots of people an apology.

You spend most of the day inside feeling regretful. You rule out cannabis therapy and assume all cannabis products will make you act impulsively. You’re left more discouraged than ever since you still don’t have a solution for your chronic pain.

In your process of experimenting with cannabis, though, you’ve overlooked an important component that determines your therapeutic experience. Your DNA.

THC adverse events quiz

Nearly 35% of the general population is genetically predisposed to making impulsive decisions and could be at risk for an adverse event with THC.* In other words, under certain conditions about one in every three people will make decisions without considering the consequences of their actions.

If you’ve made bad decisions as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis therapy is misaligned with your unique genetic profile.

Experiencing increased impulsivity with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to making impulsive decisions.

Below, you’ll learn more about impulsive behavior, how cannabis interacts with your genetics, and how you can manage THC adverse events with the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan.

*Endocanna Health used specific allele frequencies and genotype heterozygosity to determine general population percentages for genetic predispositions.

What is impulsive behavior?

Impulsivity is the tendency to act prematurely without fully considering the consequences of your choices. If you make decisions quickly that you’re prone to question or regret later, you may be acting impulsively. 

Impulsive behavior is influenced by a host of environmental, developmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors. For example, prescription medications, stimulant drugs, and past traumas can each influence impulsive behavior and can lead to quick or impaired decision making. 

It’s important to keep in mind that impulsivity occurs along a spectrum. For example, you may blurt something out without thinking about the consequences, which can be considered a mild form of impulsivity. Or you may make more severe impulsive decisions like suddenly deciding to drive your car well past the speed limit. 

Characteristics of impulsive behavior can include:[1]

  • Frequent interrupting, 
  • Being easily distracted, 
  • Restlessness, 
  • Aggression, or
  • Engaging in risky or dangerous behavior. 

Key takeaway: 

  •  Impulsivity is the tendency to act prematurely without fully considering the consequences of your choices.
  • Frequent interrupting, aggression, and engaging in risky behavior are characteristics of impulsivity.
  • Prescription medications, stimulant drugs, past traumas, and genetic variants can each play a part in determining your decision making abilities and tendencies. 

Impulsivity as an adverse side effect of THC.

Like all chemical compounds, including prescription medications and other substances, cannabis can lead to side effects. 

Some cannabis side effects are therapeutic. They allow you to relax and provide relief from disorders, diseases, or discomfort. 

Other cannabis side effects, however, cause distress to the body and result in adverse events. Approximately 31% of the general population has reported experiencing an adverse event with THC, which means adverse reactions are fairly common.†

Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience bad decision making or impulsive behavior with cannabis. 

If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate feelings of stress and anxiety with cannabis. 

Knowing your risks starts with understanding your genetic predisposition to adverse events.

You should always consult your healthcare provider when making decisions regarding your wellness routine and cannabis therapy.

†Endocanna Health determined the potential predisposition of THC adverse events in the general population.

Key takeaway: 

THC adverse events quiz

Impulsivity, THC, and your endocannabinoid system.

Your endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a system of messengers found throughout your body. Along with a host of critical functions, your ECS is responsible for regulating important systems like your mood, appetite, and immune function.

When you use a cannabis varietal, strain, or product, the cannabinoid and terpene profiles interact with your endocannabinoid system. The external cannabinoids (exogenous cannabinoids) are added to your system’s internal cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), which can disrupt or augment your ECS messaging.

Psychoactive effects from cannabis, like impulsive behavior and bad decision making, are caused by cannabinoids binding to the cannabinoid receptors within your body.

Genetically speaking, some people are predisposed to impulsivity. For example, dopamine is a neurotransmitter involved in impulse behavior. Genetic variants in the DBH gene, a gene which is responsible for metabolizing dopamine, can predispose you to impulsive behavior making you at risk for acting quickly or making bad decisions.[2] Since THC can activate neurons that release dopamine, it’s possible that THC can influence impulsivity.

Key Takeaway:

  • When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system. This can trigger negative side effects like poor decision making in populations who are genetically predisposed to impulsive behavior.

How to mitigate impulsive behaviors when you’re using cannabis. 

If you’ve experienced adverse events with THC, or if the risk of experiencing adverse events with THC is preventing you from trying cannabis therapy, you should know that adverse side effects are completely manageable. 

The key to mitigating impulsive behavior when you’re using cannabis is to decode your genetics, discover your unique endocompatibility, and use cannabis strains, varietal, and products with cannabinoid and terpene profiles that are aligned with your genotype. 

With the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan, you can find reliable products to optimize your cannabis therapy outcomes.

To learn more, take this 10 question quiz and discover if you may be genetically predisposed to adverse events with THC. 

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

The post Making bad decisions on THC? Learn how your DNA can change that. appeared first on Endo·dna.

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Why THC makes you anxious and what you can do about it. https://endodna.com/2020/07/21/why-thc-makes-you-anxious-and-what-you-can-do-about-it/ https://endodna.com/2020/07/21/why-thc-makes-you-anxious-and-what-you-can-do-about-it/#respond Tue, 21 Jul 2020 10:57:00 +0000 https://endodna.com/?p=209397 If you’ve experienced stress or anxiety as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis therapy is misaligned with your unique genetic profile.

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Learn how your DNA can alert you to your genetic predispositions and help you mitigate adverse reactions with cannabis.

Does this sound familiar to you? You’re considering a cannabis product to help you manage your stress levels and calm your anxiety. You’ve been extra stressed lately and it’s starting to affect how well you do your job and take care of your kids.

Your best friend swears that a particular cannabis strain helps her manage symptoms just like yours, so you decide to give it a try. You buy some pre-rolled cannabis on your way home from work and smoke it in your garage.

Almost immediately, you get stressed out. Your heart rate speeds up, your breathing is erratic, and you can’t stop thinking about a mistake you made at work earlier in the day. You’re convinced he’ll fire you in the morning. You think you’re on the verge of a panic attack.

You tell your family you’re not feeling well and go to bed early.

When you tell your friend about your experience, she says you got unlucky and bought a bad batch. She laughs, calls you a lightweight, and says you can share her vape tomorrow.

The next day, you take a few pulls from your friend’s vape and feel your body starting to prick with sweat. When you start to have tunnel vision, you catch a cab home and spend the rest of the day locked in your bathroom.

In the morning, you rule out cannabis therapy and assume all cannabis products will make your anxiety worse. You’re left more discouraged than ever.

In the process of trial and error, though, you’ve overlooked an important component that determines your therapeutic experience with cannabis. Your DNA.

Nearly 53% of the general population is genetically predisposed to experiencing stress and could be at risk for an adverse event with THC.* In other words, under certain conditions more than half of the population is at risk of experiencing symptoms like sweating, worrying, or hyperalertness due to their genetic makeup.

If you’ve experienced stress or anxiety as an adverse event with THC, it’s likely because your cannabis therapy is misaligned with your unique genetic profile.

Experiencing increased stress and anxiety with cannabis is manageable. Think of it like this: the cannabis formulations you’re currently using aren’t optimally compatible with your DNA. To mitigate adverse reactions, you’ll want to use cannabis formulations that don’t trigger your unique genetic predisposition to stress reactivity and anxiety.

Below, you’ll learn more about stress reactivity, how cannabis interacts with your genetics, and how you can manage THC adverse events with the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan.

*Endocanna Health used specific allele frequencies and genotype heterozygosity to determine general population percentages for genetic predispositions.
THC adverse events quiz

What is stress reactivity? 

Stress reactivity is your body’s reaction to stressors. Depending on a host of factors, you may experience mild, moderate, or severe reactions to stress. 

Environmental, developmental, and epigenetic factors all play a part to determine your mental and physical stress response. 

Stress reactivity occurs along a spectrum. Sometimes your reaction to stress can be small and barely noticeable. For example, when you’re under stress your autonomic nervous system may become active and cause your pupils to constrict. This is a standard stress response, although you may not notice when it happens. 

Sometimes your reaction to stress can be a bit more urgent and cause major changes throughout your body. For example, when you’re in a stressful situation, your body produces a surge of hormones that causes your blood vessels to narrow and your blood pressure to spike.[1] You may notice your heart pounding or tightness in your chest. 

Common stress response symptoms can include:[2]

  • Sweating,
  • Trembling,
  • Irritability, 
  • Headaches, 
  • Restlessness,
  • Increased heart rate,
  • Racing thoughts,
  • Feelings of impending doom, or
  • Panic attacks.

In some cases, stress symptoms are beneficial. They can alert you to danger, help you pay close attention, and prepare you for fight or flight in the face of a threatening situation. 

In other cases, however, stress symptoms can be debilitating, especially when there is no tangible or immediate threat. When your body reacts to a perceived threat and sounds its internal alarms, you might be left feeling confused, afraid, nervous, or anxious. 

If you’re prone to experiencing these symptoms, or if you’ve had a panic attack in the past, you may be genetically predisposed to high stress reactivity.

Key takeaway: 

  • Stress reactivity is your response to stressors. 
  • If you’re prone to experiencing symptoms like restlessness, increased heart rate, nervousness, anxiety, or panic attacks, you may be genetically predisposed to high stress reactivity.

Stress and anxiety as an adverse side effect of THC.

Like all chemical compounds, including prescription medications and other substances, cannabis can lead to side effects.

Some cannabis side effects are therapeutic. They allow you to relax and provide relief from disorders, diseases, or discomfort. 

Other cannabis side effects, however, cause distress to the body and result in adverse events. Approximately 31% of the general population has reported experiencing an adverse event with THC, which means adverse reactions are fairly common.†

Adverse events with THC can leave you confused, afraid, or wondering if cannabis therapy is right for you—especially if you experience high stress reactivity or increased stress and anxiety with cannabis. 

If you’re considering using cannabis for any reason, you should know your risks of experiencing adverse events with THC. With the right knowledge, precautions, and cannabinoid and terpene formulations, you can achieve the optimal experience for your therapeutic needs and mitigate feelings of stress and anxiety with cannabis. 

Knowing your risks starts with understanding your genetic predisposition to adverse events.

You should always consult your healthcare provider when making decisions regarding your wellness routine and cannabis therapy.

†Endocanna Health determined the potential predisposition of THC adverse events in the general population.

Key takeaway:

THC adverse events quiz

Stress, THC, and your endocannabinoid system. 

Your endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a system of messengers found throughout your body. Like most of your biological systems, your ECS is as unique as your thumbprint. It’s functioning is determined by genetic, epigenetic, developmental, and environmental factors. Along with a host of critical functions, your ECS is responsible for regulating important systems like your mood, appetite, and immune function. 

When you use a particular cannabis varietal, strain, or product, the cannabinoid and terpene profiles interact with your endocannabinoid system. The external cannabinoids (exogenous cannabinoids) are added to your system’s internal cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), which can disrupt or augment your ECS messaging. 

Psychoactive effects from cannabis, like stress and anxiety, are caused by cannabinoids binding to the cannabinoid receptors within your body. Depending on the cannabinoid and terpene ratios of your cannabis product and your own unique genetic coding, the resulting effects are either therapeutic or lead to an adverse reaction.[3]

If you’re predisposed to high stress reactivity based on your genotype, you may be at risk for experiencing stress and anxiety as an adverse event with THC. 

Interestingly, taking cannabis has also been found to activate the HPA axis, especially when taken in high doses.[4] The HPA axis (a term used to represent the interaction between the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and adrenal glands) plays an important role in the body’s stress response. This can further account for stress reactivity as an adverse event with THC. 

Key takeaway:

  • When cannabinoids enter your body, they disrupt the normal functioning of your endocannabinoid system (ECS).

  • This can trigger symptoms of stress and anxiety in populations who are genetically predisposed to high stress reactivity.

THC stress anxiety panic

How to mitigate symptoms of stress and anxiety when you’re using cannabis. 

If you’ve experienced adverse events with THC, or if the risk of experiencing adverse events with THC is preventing you from trying cannabis therapy, you should know that adverse side effects are completely manageable. 

The key to mitigating symptoms of stress and anxiety when you’re using cannabis is to decode your genetics, discover your unique endocompatibility, and use cannabis strains, varietal, and products with cannabinoid and terpene profiles that are aligned with your genotype. 

With the right science-backed knowledge and wellness plan, you can find reliable products to optimize your cannabis therapy outcomes.

To learn more, take this 10 question quiz to find out if you may be genetically predisposed to adverse events with THC. 

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

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Does your DNA hold clues about your immune health? Find out why your unique genetic variants matter. https://endodna.com/2020/07/17/does-your-dna-hold-clues-about-your-immune-health-find-out-why-your-unique-genetic-variants-matter/ https://endodna.com/2020/07/17/does-your-dna-hold-clues-about-your-immune-health-find-out-why-your-unique-genetic-variants-matter/#respond Fri, 17 Jul 2020 11:18:00 +0000 https://endodna.com/?p=209384 Learn how genetic variants in your DNA can alert you to your unique health risks so you can take action to protect your immune system.

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Learn how genetic variants in your DNA can alert you to your unique health risks so you can take action to protect your immune system.

To date, nearly 9.6 million people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide.[1] And, since many scientists and disease specialists predict a spike in cases this winter, many of us are still figuring out how to best protect ourselves from the invisible pathogens lurking in the environment. 

When you go to the grocery store you worry about touching the shopping cart handle. Or when you go for a walk with your kids, you cringe when they pick up the playground toys. You keep hand sanitizer in your car so you can use it on the go and a spare mask in your glove box just in case.

By now, you know to wash your hands frequently, cover your mouth in public, and practice social distancing to stay safe. But it’s still difficult to know if your precautions are good enough. 

Most days you find yourself wondering if there’s anything else you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones. 

Thanks to the science of genetics, there’s another way to be proactive about protecting your immune health. You can map your DNA to learn about your own individual predispositions to certain immune reactions, immune disorders, and vitamin deficiencies. 

Most of the time, we all follow the same guidelines to stay healthy. But knowing your unique immune system strengths and weaknesses can inform you what precautions are necessary to mitigate your risks and avoid serious health complications.

Getting an immune function genetics report is like having access to your body’s playbook. It’ll help you understand how your body will react to invasive pathogens so you can support your immune system efficiently and effectively. 

For example, if you learn that you have a genetic predisposition to develop breast cancer, you might choose to quit smoking. Likewise, if you learn that you have a genetic predisposition to develop respiratory tract infections—a severe and problematic symptom of COVID-19—you might opt for home delivery grocery services when COVID-19 cases spike in your area. 

When you know your genetic predispositions and precise risks, you can take the right precautions to protect yourself against pathogens in your environment. 

Especially in the face of the novel coronavirus, knowledge is power. Know your genetics. Know your immunity. Know your risks.

Free immune Function Genetics Report

Your genetic variants make you unique.

Your genes are responsible for all your biological traits. They’re the basic unit of heredity, and they carry information that determines which features and characteristics are passed on to you from your parents. Essentially, your genes govern your biological makeup and make you uniquely you. 

For example, if you have green eyes like your mother, it’s because you’ve inherited genetic information from her that determines eye color. If you’re tall and athletic like your father, you’ve inherited his genetic coding that determines your height and athletic capabilities.

There are approximately 25,000 genes in every human, according to the Human Genome Project.[2] Most genetic information in the human genome is the same from person to person. These are the genetic instructions that wire you as a human, rather than a dog or a fish. 

But there is a small percentage of your genes (less than 1% of the total) that are uniquely yours. These are the genetic variations that determine your physical appearances, such as your hair and skin color. They also dictate your unique susceptibilities, predispositions, and behaviors, such as your genetic risks to develop serious illnesses like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. 

Since parents pass their genes on to their offspring, some health risks and diseases tend to cluster in families, just like other inheritable traits. 

Key takeaway:

  • Your genes are the blueprints from which your body builds itself and carries out its internal functions.
  • Across all humans, most genetic information is the same.
  • Less than 1 percent of your genes, however, are unique to you.
  • They dictate your physical appearances, such as your eye and hair color, and they govern your biological processes that determine your health. For example, some genetic variants are linked to an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. 

How is my DNA related to my immunity?

Getting sick can feel like an unlucky draw. But your adaptive immune response to pathogens (the response that takes place internally after you’ve been exposed to germs) isn’t random. In fact, it’s mostly determined by specialized instructions in your DNA. 

Have you ever caught a virus that was going around at work? In the afternoon you feel a sore throat coming on and the next morning you’re on the couch unable to move. You call out of work for the entire week because you end up with a severe case of bronchitis and your doctor advises you to rest. 

You hear your officemate also called out sick. But when you check in with them, they say they only felt sick for a day or two and were back on their feet in no time. 

The difference in your reaction to the same virus is partially due to your genetics that govern your immune responses. 

Recently, researchers at King’s College London have determined that nearly three-quarters of immune traits are influenced by genes. To complete their study, researchers analyzed 23,000 immune traits in 497 adult female twins. They concluded that adaptive immune responses are mostly determined by genetic variants.[3] 

Many genetic variants in DNA are benign. Their chemical variations have no harmful effects. But some genetic variations and biological markers have been scientifically linked to diseases, disorders, and health risks. For example, the BRCA gene has been linked to a predisposition to developing certain types of breast cancer. Other genetic markers are related to predispositions like stress, mental health disorders, and immune functions.[4] 

Hopefully, future studies will work to find associations between genetic variants and other complex health problems like heart disease, diabetes, and different forms of cancers. 

To learn more about how your DNA and immune system work together to protect you, click here.

Key takeaway:

  • Your DNA is full of instructions that govern your immune responses.
  • Genetic variations are responsible for your health efficiencies and deficiencies, which is why the same virus can have multiple effects on different people.
  • Certain genetic variants are linked with increased risk of diseases or immune system difficulties.
Free Immune Genetics Report

Which DNA variants are especially important to immune health?

There isn’t one immune system gene, though there are many genetic variants that have a profound effect on your predisposition to experience or develop health complications. 

Scientists keep track of genes by abbreviating their long, complex names. Genetic names are usually abbreviated with letters and, sometimes, numbers. For example, a gene that has been associated with cystic fibrosis is called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Its abbreviated name is CFTR. 

To safeguard your immune system, it’s important to know your genetic predispositions and risks for a variety of biological processes. For a holistic picture of your immune system, you should consider genetic variants that determine your risk for experiencing: 

  • Anxiety (FAAH gene),
  • Nasal inflammation (BDNF gene)
  • Asthma (TNF gene)
  • Influenza (CD55, TNF, and IL17 genes)
  • Severity of influenza symptoms (TNF gene)
  • Respiratory Tract Infections (CNR2 gene)
  • Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura, an autoimmune disease (CNR2 gene)
  • Pain Sensitivity (FAAH gene), and
  • Vitamin deficiencies (RBP4, FUT2, ALPL genes).

If you have genetic variants that determine you’re at risk for experiencing any of these events, you’ll want to support your immune system accordingly. 

It’s important to note that having a genetic predisposition does not mean that you will develop a certain illness. It means that you have an increased risk of experiencing an illness, disease, or biological event in your lifetime when compared to someone who does not have that genetic variant or predisposition. 

Key takeaway:

  • For a holistic picture of your immune system, consider genetic variants associated with predispositions to experience anxiety, nasal inflammation asthma, influenza, respiratory tract infections, autoimmune diseases, and vitamin deficiencies.
  • Your genetics can also tell you if you’re predisposed to experiencing severe flu systems and if you have acute sensitivities to pain. 

Get your Free Immune Function Genetics Report today.  

In the midst of the global pandemic, it’s best to take the most thorough precautions available to protect yourself. For many—especially immunocompromised and elderly populations—that means getting a genetics report to know your unique predispositions to health risks. 

Think of it like this: before you go to work in the morning you check the weather forecast. If the weather app predicts sunshine, you wear a short-sleeved shirt; if there’s a chance of rain, you pack a parka. If there’s a hurricane warning you call out of work and board up your windows so you can stay safe. 

Getting a genetics report is like tuning in to your immune system’s forecast. When you know your risks, you can better prepare for them. And for many, that makes all the difference. 

To get your Free Immune Function Genetics Report and discover your genetic predispositions, upload your DNA results to Endo-DNA here

If you’ve never had a DNA test before, click here to order one to your house today.

Endocanna Health is a biotechnology company committed to helping consumers find the right cannabinoid products to enhance their health and wellness. Using our breakthrough DNA test, Endo·dna, we empower you to take control of your health with access to over 55 different health reports that include suggestions for the best CBD and cannabis products that match your unique genetic code. Visit us here to find out more!

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